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How NIF Works
 
05:22
The National Ignition Facility, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is the world's largest laser system... 192 huge laser beams in a massive building, all focused down at the last moment at a 2 millimeter ball containing frozen hydrogen gas. The goal is to achieve fusion... getting more energy out than was used to create it. It's never been done before under controlled conditions, just in nuclear weapons and in stars. The purpose is threefold: to create an almost limitless supply of safe, carbon-free, proliferation-free electricity; examine new regimes of astrophysics as well as basic science; and study the inner-workings of the U.S. stockpile of nuclear weapons to ensure they remain safe, secure and reliable without the need for underground testing. More information about NIF can be found at: https://lasers.llnl.gov
Weapon physicist declassifies rescued nuclear test films
 
03:11
The U.S. conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests between 1945 and 1962, with multiple cameras capturing each event at around 2,400 frames per second. But in the decades since, around 10,000 of these films sat idle, scattered across the country in high-security vaults. Not only were they gathering dust, the film material itself was slowly decomposing, bringing the data they contained to the brink of being lost forever. For the past five years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapon physicist Greg Spriggs and a crack team of film experts, archivists and software developers have been on a mission to hunt down, scan, reanalyze and declassify these decomposing films. The goals are to preserve the films’ content before it’s lost forever, and provide better data to the post-testing-era scientists who use computer codes to help certify that the aging U.S. nuclear deterrent remains safe, secure and effective. Read more: https://www.llnl.gov/news See the declassified LLNL tests: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvGO_dWo8VfcmG166wKRy5z-GlJ_OQND5
Element 117
 
01:54
Watch animation of the discovery of the newest member of the Period Table of the Elements. An international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, including two Department of Energy national laboratories and two universities, has discovered the newest superheavy element, element 117. The team included scientists from the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), the Research Institute for Advanced Reactors (Dimitrovgrad), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Animation by Kwei-Yu Chu/LLNL
Shock Compression of Solid Hydrogen
 
02:31
Hydrogen is the most abundant material in the universe and is also the simplest element. Any theory that attempts a description of physics at the quantum level must account for its behavior in a very wide range of physical environments. Under high pressure in particular it has been theoretically predicted to exist in a metallic form and furthermore to possess remarkable properties such as high-temperature superconductivity and a liquid ground state. The behavior of hydrogen under extreme conditions is also vital to planetary science especially in the case of Jupiter and also many of the extrasolar planets thus far discovered. Furthermore, it is highly likely that future technological applications of hydrogen (e.g. to energy storage) will benefit from an improved and detailed understanding of its fundamental nature. The study of hydrogen under extreme conditions remains experimentally very challenging. Here we illustrate a technique that involves the laser shock loading of hydrogen precompressed in the diamond anvil cell. We employ an ultrafast interferometric approach for probing the shocked material, which, because of its optical nature, is inherently sensitive to phase changes that will strongly affect optical properties e.g. metallization. Also, by precompressing the material we can change the initial density over a very wide range (corresponding to pressures of up to potentially a million atmospheres) and thus, in combination with controlled shock compression, have great flexibility to tune the final state conditions to coincide with the relevant region of the phase diagram. Finally, our inherently ultrahigh time resolution (of order picoseconds), allows us to directly measure shock parameters of the very fast shock wave (e.g. particle and shock velocities), and also means that we can assign time scales to phase transitions that may also be extremely fast. This work was supported by EFree: Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments https://efree.gl.ciw.edu/ and is a collaboration between the Geophysical Laboratory (Carnegie Institution of Washington) https://www.gl.ciw.edu/ and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory https://www.llnl.gov/ .
What Is A Supercomputer? | The Supercomputing Series
 
02:52
Supercomputing, scientific computing, and high-performance computing (HPC)...all cool buzzwords, but what do they actually mean? What is a supercomputer? How does it work? And why do we use them? Find out in the first video of our Supercomputing Series!
Author of ‘The Martian’ thrills Lab employees
 
47:54
Imagine being inadvertently left for dead on Mars, completely alone and abandoned by your crew, with nothing but your wits and a scant amount of precious supplies to keep you alive. That’s the enthralling premise of the best-selling science-fiction survival novel and soon-to-be released motion picture, “The Martian,” scheduled to run in theaters nationwide on Oct. 2. Amidst a whirlwind media blitz, the book’s author, Andy Weir, took time to visit the Laboratory on Wednesday, entertaining a packed house of nearly 400 Lab employees and special guests with his wit, vast and varied scientific knowledge and tales of his sudden rise to stardom. “It’s kind of a homecoming,” Weir said. “It’s special for me because it’s where I grew up.” Read more about Andy's visit to LLNL: https://www.llnl.gov/news/author-%E2%80%98-martian%E2%80%99-thrills-lab-employees
A day at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
 
03:35
Work with the brightest minds in science and engineering to solve some of the most challenging problems facing the nation using world-class research capabilities and tools. Search jobs: https://careers.llnl.gov/ For more than 60 years, we have used science and technology to make the world a safer place. We lead the nation in stockpile science and deliver innovative solutions for the nation's most challenging security problems. Research Areas - High Performance Computing: Scientific computing for the nation - Engineering: Technologies at extreme scales - Physics & Life Sciences: Frontier scientific research - Global Security: Applied science & technology - Lasers: National Ignition Facility - User Facilities: Unparalleled research capabilities - Internally Funded Research: Institutional investment in innovation Missions - Basic Science: Science, Technology, and Engineering - Bio-Security: Detection, characterization and mitigation - Counterterrorism: Preventing and mitigating catastrophe - Defense: Precision effects and situational awareness - Energy: Energy and environmental security - Intelligence: Analysis, policy and operational support - Nonproliferation: Technical solutions to evolving challenge - Weapons: Stewards of the nuclear deterrent
Operation Hardtack-1 - Juniper 53070
 
01:12
The U.S. conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests between 1945 and 1962, with multiple cameras capturing each event at around 2,400 frames per second. But in the decades since, around 10,000 of these films sat idle, scattered across the country in high-security vaults. Not only were they gathering dust, the film material itself was slowly decomposing, bringing the data they contained to the brink of being lost forever. For the past five years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapon physicist Greg Spriggs and a crack team of film experts, archivists and software developers have been on a mission to hunt down, scan, reanalyze and declassify these decomposing films. The goals are to preserve the films’ content before it’s lost forever, and provide better data to the post-testing-era scientists who use computer codes to help certify that the aging U.S. nuclear deterrent remains safe, secure and effective. Read more: https://www.llnl.gov/news/physicist-declassifies-rescued-nuclear-test-films LLNL Copyright and Reuse Policy: https://www.llnl.gov/copyright-and-reuse See the declassified LLNL tests: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvGO_dWo8VfcmG166wKRy5z-GlJ_OQND5
Operation Hardtack-1 - Poplar 52894
 
03:34
The U.S. conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests between 1945 and 1962, with multiple cameras capturing each event at around 2,400 frames per second. But in the decades since, around 10,000 of these films sat idle, scattered across the country in high-security vaults. Not only were they gathering dust, the film material itself was slowly decomposing, bringing the data they contained to the brink of being lost forever. For the past five years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapon physicist Greg Spriggs and a crack team of film experts, archivists and software developers have been on a mission to hunt down, scan, reanalyze and declassify these decomposing films. The goals are to preserve the films’ content before it’s lost forever, and provide better data to the post-testing-era scientists who use computer codes to help certify that the aging U.S. nuclear deterrent remains safe, secure and effective. Read more: https://www.llnl.gov/news/physicist-declassifies-rescued-nuclear-test-films LLNL Copyright and Reuse Policy: https://www.llnl.gov/copyright-and-reuse See the declassified LLNL tests: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvGO_dWo8VfcmG166wKRy5z-GlJ_OQND5
Answering FAQs about the Nuclear Test Films
 
15:25
For the past five years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapon physicist Greg Spriggs and a crack team of film experts, archivists and software developers have been on a mission to hunt down, scan, reanalyze and declassify film recordings of the U.S. atmospheric nuclear tests. In this video, Lab science communicator Maren Hunsberger interviews Greg Spriggs to answer some of the most frequently asked questions we've received about the test films since sharing them on YouTube. Read more: https://www.llnl.gov/news/llnl-releases-newly-declassified-test-videos See the declassified LLNL tests: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvGO_dWo8VfcmG166wKRy5z-GlJ_OQND5
Preventing toxic effects of peanut butter
 
02:15
LLNL researchers Graham Bench and Ken Turteltaub (on this video clip) found that giving someone a small dose of chlorophyll or chlorophyllin — found in green leafy vegetables such as spinach, broccoli and kale — could reverse the effects of aflatoxin poisoning. Aflatoxin is a potent, naturally occurring carcinogenic mycotoxin that is associated with the growth of two types of mold: Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. Food and food crops most prone to aflatoxin contamination include corn and corn products, cottonseed, peanuts and peanut products, tree nuts and milk. More information at: https://publicaffairs.llnl.gov/news/news_releases/2010/NR-10-01-03.html
NIF | How the ARC Laser Works
 
02:48
The Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) laser is an extremely powerful short pulse laser. It operates within the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser and enables researchers to probe and create extreme states of matter. Visit the links below to find out more. For info about the ARC laser and its recent experiments: https://lasers.llnl.gov/science/advanced-laser-systems/advanced-radiographic-capability To learn about the chirped pulse amplification process that allows the ARC laser to operate: https://lasers.llnl.gov/news/nobelists-invention-helped-spark-llnls-short-pulse-laser To see a background video about how the NIF laser works: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yixhyPN0r3g Compton radiography is one of the many types of experiments that uses the ARC laser. Compton radiography allows researchers to see through matter with densities typical to those found in stars. NIF, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration, a semi-autonomous agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The world’s largest and most energetic laser, NIF serves as a critical research facility supporting the U.S science-based Stockpile Stewardship Program and also enables fundamental research efforts in fusion ignition, discovery science, and national security. To learn more about National Ignition Facility & Photon Sciences (NIF & PS), visit: https://lasers.llnl.gov
Drought tolerant garden
 
04:29
Gardening expert Christina Elliott of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory takes you on a guided tour of the Alameda County Master Gardener's Demonstration Garden and its drought tolerant plants.
3D Printing in a Fraction of the Time
 
01:17
By using laser-generated, hologram-like 3D images flashed into photosensitive resin, researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Lab, along with collaborators at UC Berkeley, the University of Rochester, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have discovered they can build complex 3D parts in a fraction of the time of traditional layer-by-layer printing. The “volumetric” 3D printing process creates parts by overlapping three laser beams that define an object’s geometry from three different directions, creating a 3D image suspended in the vat of resin. The laser light, which is at a higher intensity where the beams intersect, is kept on for about 10 seconds, enough time to cure the object. Read more: https://www.llnl.gov/news/volumetric-3d-printing-builds-need-speed
Introducing the Sierra supercomputer
 
04:11
Introducing Sierra, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s next-generation supercomputer. The IBM-built advanced technology high-performance system is projected to provide four to six times the sustained performance and be at least seven times more powerful than LLNL’s current most advanced system, Sequoia, with a 125 petaFLOP/s peak. At approximately 11 megawatts, Sierra will also be about five times more power efficient than Sequoia. By combining two types of processor chips—IBM’s Power 9 processors and NVIDIA’s Volta graphics processing units (GPUs)—Sierra is designed for more efficient overall operations and is expected to be a promising architecture for extreme-scale computing. The new system is part of the CORAL (Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore) procurement, a first-of-its-kind collaboration between ORNL, Argonne, and LLNL that culminated in three pre-exascale high performance computing (HPC) systems to be delivered in the 2017 timeframe. CORAL was established by DOE to leverage supercomputing investments, to streamline procurement processes, and to reduce the costs to develop supercomputers. Sierra will provide computational resources that are essential for nuclear weapon scientists to fulfill the National Nuclear Security Administration’s stockpile stewardship mission through simulation in lieu of underground testing. The design for Sierra uses IBM Power architecture processors connected by NVLink to NVIDIA Volta graphics processing units (GPUs). NVLink is an interconnect bus that provides higher performance than the traditional Peripheral Component Interconnect Express for attaching hardware devices in a computer, allowing coherent direct access to GPU and memory. The machine will be connected with a Mellanox InfiniBand network using a fat-tree topology—a versatile network design that can be tailored to work efficiently with the bandwidth available. It is expected to be fully installed and accepted in Fiscal Year 2018.
Operation Teapot - Turk 28100
 
01:40
The U.S. conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests between 1945 and 1962, with multiple cameras capturing each event at around 2,400 frames per second. But in the decades since, around 10,000 of these films sat idle, scattered across the country in high-security vaults. Not only were they gathering dust, the film material itself was slowly decomposing, bringing the data they contained to the brink of being lost forever. For the past five years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapon physicist Greg Spriggs and a crack team of film experts, archivists and software developers have been on a mission to hunt down, scan, reanalyze and declassify these decomposing films. The goals are to preserve the films’ content before it’s lost forever, and provide better data to the post-testing-era scientists who use computer codes to help certify that the aging U.S. nuclear deterrent remains safe, secure and effective. Read more: https://www.llnl.gov/news/physicist-declassifies-rescued-nuclear-test-films LLNL Copyright and Reuse Policy: https://www.llnl.gov/copyright-and-reuse See the declassified LLNL tests: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...
Working at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
 
03:35
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory promotes a culture of innovation, excellence, diversity, and team science that benefits the nation as well as the world. As a result, our employees have received the highest honors in industry and academia, and have been awarded numerous patents in the fields of engineering and science discovery. Come join us. More information at https://careers.llnl.gov
Stockpile Stewardship: How we ensure the nuclear deterrent without testing
 
14:41
In the 1990s, the U.S. nuclear weapons program shifted emphasis from developing new designs to dismantling thousands of existing weapons and maintaining a much smaller enduring stockpile. The United States ceased underground nuclear testing, and the Department of Energy created the Stockpile Stewardship Program to maintain the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent without full-scale testing. This video gives a behind the scenes look at a set of unique capabilities at Lawrence Livermore that are indispensable to the Stockpile Stewardship Program: high performance computing, the Superblock category II nuclear facility, the JASPER a two stage gas gun, the High Explosive Applications Facility (HEAF), the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and the Site 300 contained firing facility. Stockpile Stewardship Program http://nnsa.energy.gov/aboutus/ourprograms/defenseprograms/aboutdefenseprograms Livermore Computing http://computation.llnl.gov/research/mission-support/WCI Superblock https://www.llnl.gov/str/March01/Sefcik.html JASPER https://str.llnl.gov/april-2013/holmes HEAF https://wci.llnl.gov/facilities/heaf National Ignition Facility https://lasers.llnl.gov/science/stockpile-stewardship Site 300 https://wci.llnl.gov/fac/site300/
A Growing Family of Targets for the National Ignition Facility
 
04:17
Remarkably tiny and precisely manufactured targets are enabling breakthrough physics and materials research. Read about the growing family of targets for the National Ignition Facility in the latest issue of Science & Technology Review (S&TR): https://str.llnl.gov/january-2016/nikroo
What is Stockpile Stewardship?
 
02:42
LLNL (along with other Department of Energy laboratories and plants) uses science and technology to assess the safety, security and reliability of the nation’s nuclear stockpile. But what does that really mean?
All About that Bayes: Probability, Statistics, and the Quest to Quantify Uncertainty
 
56:36
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory statistician Kristin Lennox delves into the history of statistics and probability in this talk, "All About that Bayes: Probability, Statistics, and the Quest to Quantify Uncertainty," given at LLNL on July 28, 2016. Abstract: The great Bayesian vs. Frequentist war has raged within statistics for almost 100 years, much to the confusion of outsiders. The Bayesian/Frequentist question is no longer academic, with both styles of inference appearing frequently in scientific literature and even the news. In this talk, Kristin Lennox aims to explain the great divide to non-statisticians, and also to answer the most important statistical question of all: how does probability allow us to better understand our world? View the PowerPoint slides from the talk at http://www.slideshare.net/LivermoreLab/all-about-that-bayes-probability-statistics-and-the-quest-to-quantify-uncertainty
How to read an LLNL energy flow chart (Sankey diagram)
 
03:03
Each year, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory releases energy flow charts that illustrate the nation's consumption and use of energy. A.J. Simon, group leader for LLNL’s energy program, breaks the 2015 chart down in this video, describing how to read the chart and what year-to-year trends he sees. More on the 2015 energy flow chart: https://www.llnl.gov/news/americans-used-less-energy-2015-according-lawrence-livermore-analysis Browse through energy, carbon and water flow charts for past years, other countries: https://flowcharts.llnl.gov/
Operation Hardtack-1 - Nutmeg 51538
 
01:11
The U.S. conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests between 1945 and 1962, with multiple cameras capturing each event at around 2,400 frames per second. But in the decades since, around 10,000 of these films sat idle, scattered across the country in high-security vaults. Not only were they gathering dust, the film material itself was slowly decomposing, bringing the data they contained to the brink of being lost forever. For the past five years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapon physicist Greg Spriggs and a crack team of film experts, archivists and software developers have been on a mission to hunt down, scan, reanalyze and declassify these decomposing films. The goals are to preserve the films’ content before it’s lost forever, and provide better data to the post-testing-era scientists who use computer codes to help certify that the aging U.S. nuclear deterrent remains safe, secure and effective. Read more: https://www.llnl.gov/news/physicist-declassifies-rescued-nuclear-test-films LLNL Copyright and Reuse Policy: https://www.llnl.gov/copyright-and-reuse See the declassified LLNL tests: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...
What happens when you combine laser beams?
 
03:39
The way the Death Star works in the fictional Star Wars universe has long been dismissed by scientists as something that defies our physical reality, but researchers at Lawrence Livermore's National Ignition Facility have found a way to successfully combine laser beams using plasma for the first time EVER https://www.llnl.gov/news/plasma-optic-combines-lasers-superbeam
Supercomputers have come a long way since 1989
 
01:26
The Cray-2 supercomputer was the world's fastest computing system from the date of its release in 1985 until its eventual replacement in 1990. The system leaned on four water-cooled vector processors to reach 1.9 GFLOPS of peak performance. In comparison, the A8 quad-core processor released in the Apple iPhone 6 is reported to be able to hit 115.2 GFLOPS. Though it's important to note that the two system were not designed to tackle the same types of tasks.
S&TR Preview: New Life for a Legacy Warhead
 
02:22
The W80-4 life-extension program requires Lawrence Livermore’s exceptional experimental, computational, and manufacturing capabilities. Read more about it in this month's issue of Science & Technology Review (S&TR): https://str.llnl.gov. LLNL-VIDEO-765317
Scientists Get Surprised by Puppies
 
05:42
"Oh my goodness, you're so cute, I don't have enough HANDS!" Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/livermore.lab/ Instagram: @livermore_Lab Twitter: @Livermore_Lab
Operation Redwing - Zuni 34325
 
01:37
The U.S. conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests between 1945 and 1962, with multiple cameras capturing each event at around 2,400 frames per second. But in the decades since, around 10,000 of these films sat idle, scattered across the country in high-security vaults. Not only were they gathering dust, the film material itself was slowly decomposing, bringing the data they contained to the brink of being lost forever. For the past five years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapon physicist Greg Spriggs and a crack team of film experts, archivists and software developers have been on a mission to hunt down, scan, reanalyze and declassify these decomposing films. The goals are to preserve the films’ content before it’s lost forever, and provide better data to the post-testing-era scientists who use computer codes to help certify that the aging U.S. nuclear deterrent remains safe, secure and effective. Read more: https://www.llnl.gov/news/physicist-declassifies-rescued-nuclear-test-films LLNL Copyright and Reuse Policy: https://www.llnl.gov/copyright-and-reuse See the declassified LLNL tests: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvGO_dWo8VfcmG166wKRy5z-GlJ_OQND5
360 video tour of the world's largest laser
 
04:32
Welcome to the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the world’s largest and most energetic laser system. It draws researchers from around the globe for experiments that can’t be conducted anywhere else on Earth. Let’s take a closer look. https://lasers.llnl.gov https://careers.llnl.gov
Unlocking the brain's mysteries: Meet the bioengineers behind next-generation neural devices
 
06:26
Bioengineers in the Neural Technologies Group at Lawrence Livermore are creating the next generation of clinical- and research-quality neural interfaces. The goal is to gain a fundamental understanding of neuroscience, treat a variety of debilitating neurological disorders (such as Parkinson's, depression, and epilepsy), and restore lost neural functions such as sight, hearing, and mobility. ____ NIH taps Lab to develop sophisticated electrode array system to monitor brain activity https://www.llnl.gov/news/newsreleases/2014/Sep/NR-14-09-6.html DARPA taps Lawrence Livermore to develop world's first neural device to restore memory https://www.llnl.gov/news/newsreleases/2014/Jul/NR-14-07-02.html Meet the LLNL Neural Tech team https://neurotech.llnl.gov/people
S&TR Preview: Quantum Computing Is Here
 
03:19
Laboratory scientists tackle the next computing frontier with innovative research and development projects. Read more about it in this month's issue of Science & Technology Review (S&TR): https://str.llnl.gov.
What Goes into a Shot at the National Ignition Facility?
 
03:46
Take a peek inside the National Ignition Facility, the world’s largest and most energetic laser, to see how we develop and execute some of the most complex experiments conducted anywhere. This one-of-a-kind facility was funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration to keep the nation’s nuclear stockpile safe, secure and effective. We also use the extreme conditions produced by NIF to study the science behind fusion ignition and to explore astrophysical phenomena such as supernovae, black holes and planetary interiors. Learn more about NIF here: https://lasers.llnl.gov/
Operation Redwing - Apache 37376
 
01:31
The U.S. conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests between 1945 and 1962, with multiple cameras capturing each event at around 2,400 frames per second. But in the decades since, around 10,000 of these films sat idle, scattered across the country in high-security vaults. Not only were they gathering dust, the film material itself was slowly decomposing, bringing the data they contained to the brink of being lost forever. For the past five years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapon physicist Greg Spriggs and a crack team of film experts, archivists and software developers have been on a mission to hunt down, scan, reanalyze and declassify these decomposing films. The goals are to preserve the films’ content before it’s lost forever, and provide better data to the post-testing-era scientists who use computer codes to help certify that the aging U.S. nuclear deterrent remains safe, secure and effective. Read more: https://www.llnl.gov/news/physicist-d... LLNL Copyright and Reuse Policy: https://www.llnl.gov/copyright-and-reuse See the declassified LLNL tests: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...
Breathable 'Second Skin' for Smart Uniforms
 
03:12
Aiming to protect soldiers from biological and chemical threats, a team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have created a material that is highly breathable yet protective from biological agents. This material is the first key component of futuristic smart uniforms that also will respond to and protect from environmental chemical hazards.
LLNL featured on Jeopardy: The science of security
 
02:35
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was featured in an entire category of clues on the TV game show "Jeopardy" on Monday, March 9. Called the "Science of Security," the category featured basic science questions that tie into Laboratory facilities and programs, among them laser science and the National Ignition Facility, high performance computing and Sequoia, astrophysics and the GeMINI planet imager, bioscience and the Microbial Detection Array and satellite technology and the Lab's work to track them for traffic control.
The Optics Whisperer: Master Optician Hones His Art at LLNL
 
02:21
Peter Thelin, master optician at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, views his increasingly rare life’s work — hand-polishing and shaping optical materials — as a form of artistic expression as much as an important contribution to scientific research. In this video Thelin discusses the factors that influenced his career choice and his unique opportunity to help in the preservation of the statue of David. For more information on Thelin and his work, see https://lasers.llnl.gov/about/who-works-at-nif/people-profiles/peter-thelin
The Dawn of an Optical Revolution | S&TR Preview
 
02:18
Combining optics design and additive manufacturing technology, Livermore creates a new class of functionally graded optical materials. Read more about it in this month's issue of Science & Technology Review (S&TR): str.llnl.gov.
Operation Hardtack-1 - Poplar 52893
 
01:45
The U.S. conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests between 1945 and 1962, with multiple cameras capturing each event at around 2,400 frames per second. But in the decades since, around 10,000 of these films sat idle, scattered across the country in high-security vaults. Not only were they gathering dust, the film material itself was slowly decomposing, bringing the data they contained to the brink of being lost forever. For the past five years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapon physicist Greg Spriggs and a crack team of film experts, archivists and software developers have been on a mission to hunt down, scan, reanalyze and declassify these decomposing films. The goals are to preserve the films’ content before it’s lost forever, and provide better data to the post-testing-era scientists who use computer codes to help certify that the aging U.S. nuclear deterrent remains safe, secure and effective. Read more: https://www.llnl.gov/news/physicist-declassifies-rescued-nuclear-test-films LLNL Copyright and Reuse Policy: https://www.llnl.gov/copyright-and-reuse See the declassified LLNL tests: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvGO_dWo8VfcmG166wKRy5z-GlJ_OQND5
LLNL scientist is passionate about targets
 
03:21
With a lifelong passion for problem-solving and a love of production, Becky Butlin has helped lead the National Ignition Facility Target Fabrication Team through obstacles and challenges for the past six years. For more information, see https://lasers.llnl.gov/about/who-works-at-nif/people-profiles/becky-butlin.
Operation Dominic - Housatonic 120256
 
07:18
The U.S. conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests between 1945 and 1962, with multiple cameras capturing each event at around 2,400 frames per second. But in the decades since, around 10,000 of these films sat idle, scattered across the country in high-security vaults. Not only were they gathering dust, the film material itself was slowly decomposing, bringing the data they contained to the brink of being lost forever. For the past five years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapon physicist Greg Spriggs and a crack team of film experts, archivists and software developers have been on a mission to hunt down, scan, reanalyze and declassify these decomposing films. The goals are to preserve the films’ content before it’s lost forever, and provide better data to the post-testing-era scientists who use computer codes to help certify that the aging U.S. nuclear deterrent remains safe, secure and effective. Read more: https://www.llnl.gov/news/physicist-declassifies-rescued-nuclear-test-films LLNL Copyright and Reuse Policy: https://www.llnl.gov/copyright-and-reuse See the declassified LLNL tests: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvGO_dWo8VfcmG166wKRy5z-GlJ_OQND5
Operation Dominic - Yukon 103013
 
01:48
The U.S. conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests between 1945 and 1962, with multiple cameras capturing each event at around 2,400 frames per second. But in the decades since, around 10,000 of these films sat idle, scattered across the country in high-security vaults. Not only were they gathering dust, the film material itself was slowly decomposing, bringing the data they contained to the brink of being lost forever. For the past five years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapon physicist Greg Spriggs and a crack team of film experts, archivists and software developers have been on a mission to hunt down, scan, reanalyze and declassify these decomposing films. The goals are to preserve the films’ content before it’s lost forever, and provide better data to the post-testing-era scientists who use computer codes to help certify that the aging U.S. nuclear deterrent remains safe, secure and effective. Read more: https://www.llnl.gov/news/physicist-declassifies-rescued-nuclear-test-films LLNL Copyright and Reuse Policy: https://www.llnl.gov/copyright-and-reuse See the declassified LLNL tests: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvGO_dWo8VfcmG166wKRy5z-GlJ_OQND5
3D printing method creates objects in one piece
 
01:04
It looks like something you might find aboard the Starship Enterprise. A projector beams a three-dimensional video into a container of photosensitive resin. The video plays while the container rotates for a few minutes — then the fluid drains, leaving behind a complete, fully formed 3D object. Though it seems like science fiction, it’s not, thanks to scientists and engineers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley), who have developed a new high-speed 3D printing method called Computed Axial Lithography (CAL). The method is described online in the Jan. 31 edition of the journal Science. Read the article here: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2019/01/30/science.aau7114 “This is a breakthrough in the space of possible methods to do additive manufacturing,” said LLNL engineer Maxim Shusteff, a co-author on the paper. “What this approach does is make it possible for interesting polymer parts to be made much more quickly, which is often a bottleneck, and we can now think about using materials that don’t work well with slower layer-by-layer methods.”
Uncrackable code for nuclear weapons
 
03:06
Mark Hart, a scientist and engineer in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL) Defense Technologies Division, has developed a new approach for ensuring nuclear weapons and their components can't fall prey to unauthorized use. The beauty of his approach: Let the weapon protect itself. “Using the random process of nuclear radioactive decay is the gold standard of random number generators,” said Mark Hart, a scientist and engineer in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL) Defense Technologies Division. “You’d have a better chance of winning both Mega Millions and Powerball on the same day than getting control of IUC-protected components.” Read more: http://1.usa.gov/1F7ux2r
How we 3D-print aerogel
 
01:11
A new type of graphene aerogel will make for better energy storage, sensors, nanoelectronics, catalysis and separations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The research appears in the April 22 edition of the journal, Nature Communications. The 3D printed graphene aerogels have high surface area, excellent electrical conductivity, are lightweight, have mechanical stiffness and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90 percent compressive strain). In addition, the 3D printed graphene aerogel microlattices show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials and much better mass transport. Read more: https://www.llnl.gov/news/3d-printed-aerogels-improve-energy-storage
Everything wrong with statistics (and how to fix it)
 
55:52
A crisis has emerged across a number of research fields with the discovery that many published results are not reproducible, and applied statistics has been assigned a substantial share of the blame. But if you ask LLNL statistician Kristin Lennox, the problem does not lie with statistical methods, but rather from misleading training for non-statisticians. Lennox, director of statistical consulting in the Computational Engineering Division, recently drew about 150 LLNL employees for a talk titled “Everything wrong with statistics (and how to fix it).” In it, she described the cause of the crisis and three golden rules researchers should apply ensure their data analysis is robust. The slides are available on Slideshare: http://bit.ly/1PoqYJw. For more information at statistics at LLNL, visit the data analytics website: https://data-analytics.llnl.gov/
The Dept. of Energy Artificial Retina project
 
05:12
LLNL has assisted in the development of the first long-term retinal prosthesis - called an artificial retina - that can function for years inside the harsh biological environment of the eye. This work has been done in collaboration with four national laboratories (Argonne, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge and Sandia), four universities (the California Institute of Technology, the Doheny Eye Institute at USC, North Carolina State University and the University of California, Santa Cruz), an industrial partner (Second Sight® Medical Products Inc. of Sylmar, Calif.) and the U.S. Department of Energy. With this device, application-specific integrated circuits transform digital images from a camera into electric signals in the eye that the brain uses to create a visual image. In clinical trials, patients with vision loss were able to successfully identify objects, increase mobility and detect movement using the artificial retina.
Operation Plumbbob - Rainier 43771
 
01:46
The U.S. conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests between 1945 and 1962, with multiple cameras capturing each event at around 2,400 frames per second. But in the decades since, around 10,000 of these films sat idle, scattered across the country in high-security vaults. Not only were they gathering dust, the film material itself was slowly decomposing, bringing the data they contained to the brink of being lost forever. For the past five years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapon physicist Greg Spriggs and a crack team of film experts, archivists and software developers have been on a mission to hunt down, scan, reanalyze and declassify these decomposing films. The goals are to preserve the films’ content before it’s lost forever, and provide better data to the post-testing-era scientists who use computer codes to help certify that the aging U.S. nuclear deterrent remains safe, secure and effective. Read more: https://www.llnl.gov/news/physicist-declassifies-rescued-nuclear-test-films LLNL Copyright and Reuse Policy: https://www.llnl.gov/copyright-and-reuse See the declassified LLNL tests: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvGO_dWo8VfcmG166wKRy5z-GlJ_OQND5
What Can Algae Do For Us?
 
09:06
Come along with Maren as we ask three scientists to explain what algae is and why it's interesting to scientists and the world. Deep dive into LLNL's work on biofuels and carbon capture! Rhona Stuart's work is partially supported by theD OE EERE’s Bioenergy Technology Office. Carbon capture/algae utilization work is funded by DOE Fossil Energy work proposal FEW0223. Support for Ryan Davis's work was provided by US Department of Energy BioEnergy Technologies Office under agreement 26336.
Operation Redwing - Zuni 34323
 
01:59
The U.S. conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests between 1945 and 1962, with multiple cameras capturing each event at around 2,400 frames per second. But in the decades since, around 10,000 of these films sat idle, scattered across the country in high-security vaults. Not only were they gathering dust, the film material itself was slowly decomposing, bringing the data they contained to the brink of being lost forever. For the past five years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapon physicist Greg Spriggs and a crack team of film experts, archivists and software developers have been on a mission to hunt down, scan, reanalyze and declassify these decomposing films. The goals are to preserve the films’ content before it’s lost forever, and provide better data to the post-testing-era scientists who use computer codes to help certify that the aging U.S. nuclear deterrent remains safe, secure and effective. Read more: https://www.llnl.gov/news/physicist-declassifies-rescued-nuclear-test-films LLNL Copyright and Reuse Policy: https://www.llnl.gov/copyright-and-reuse See the declassified LLNL tests: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvGO_dWo8VfcmG166wKRy5z-GlJ_OQND5