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Videos uploaded by user “Sea Turtle Biologist”
The Sea Turtle with a Straw in its Nostril - No To Single Use Plastics [Short Version]
 
03:48
This video shows why plastic trash is detrimental to marine life and why especially single use plastics, such as drinking straws, are one of the most useless items made out of plastic, especially if they end up in our oceans. If you would like to support our research for the next three years, please think about donating to our GoFundMe Campaign http://gofundme.com/wuhvd6zj SAY "NO" TO PLASTIC STRAWS, AND ANY KIND OF ONE-TIME USE PLASTIC ITEMS! What are single-use plastic items? http://www.greeneriepa.org/single-use... http://singleuseplastic.co.uk/what-we... Our Story: Our research team in collaboration with Christine Figgener and Dr. Nathan J. Robinson found a male Olive Ridley sea turtle during our in-water research trip in Costa Rica. He had a 10-12 cm PLASTIC STRAW lodged in his nostril. After initially thinking that we are looking at a parasitic worm, and trying to remove it to identify it, we cut a small piece of to investigate further and finally identified what we were REALLY looking at. After a short debate about what we should do we removed it with the plier of a swiss army knive which was the only tool available on our small boat (not intended for overnight stays), since we were on the ocean, in a developing country, a few hours away from the coast and several hours away from any vet (probably days from any vet specialised in reptiles, not to mention sea turtles) and x-ray machines. Plus, we would have incured a penalty (up to time in jail) on ourselves by removing the turtle since that is beyond our research permits. He did very obviously not enjoy the procedure very much, but we hope that he is now able to breath more freely. The blood from the shoulder is from a 6mm skin biopsy we took previously to this event for a genetic study (part of our permitted research), which usually doesn't bleed much, but which started bleeding while restraining the turtle. We disinfected the air passageway with iodine and kept the turtle for observation before releasing him back into the wild. The bleeding stopped pretty much immediately after the removal of the straw. The turtle very likely ate the straw and regurgitated the straw where it ended up in the wrong passageway. The nasal cavity of sea turtles is connected directly to the palate (roof of the mouth) by a long nasopharyngeal duct. Copyright: Christine Figgener http://ocean.tamu.edu/people/students... http://puranatura.zenfolio.com/ To use this video in a commercial player or in broadcasts, please email [email protected] What can you do? REDUCE (REFUSE=STRAWS)/ RE-USE/ RECYCLE Pledge to not use straws anymore: http://www.plasticpollutioncoalition.org/ http://thelastplasticstraw.org/ http://www.recycling-guide.org.uk/rrr... ORGANISE BEACH CLEAN-UPS! An amazing plastic clean-up project is the TWO HANDS PROJECT, collect trash and post it on facebook! https://www.facebook.com/twohandsproject http://www.twohandsproject.org/ MORE CAMPAIGNS AND INFOS: http://micro2016.sciencesconf.org/ http://www.kcet.org/news/redefine/red... http://www.plasticchange.org/en/om-pl... http://theoceancleanup.com
Views: 388065 Sea Turtle Biologist
Sea Turtle Entangled in Ghost Net Rescued
 
04:32
This video shows the detrimental effects of so-called ghost nets on marine animals. ***Warning: GRAPHIC CONTENT*** Video Credit and Copyright: Christine Figgener *** This footage is managed exclusively by Viralvideouk.com. If you wish to license this footage please contact [email protected] For more viral videos check here https://www.youtube.com/user/viralvideouk1 ** ----- Almost to the day exactly one year ago my research team found a plastic drinking straw embedded in a male olive ridley sea turtle's nostril (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wH878t78bw). We removed it and hopefully eased his suffering and improved his quality of life. This past 9th of August 2016, my research team once again encountered a sea turtle in distress. We found an exhausted olive ridley female swimming close to our research boat and she was dragging a huge bulk of discarded fishing net behind her. Parts of it were wrapped around her throat and had already started to cut into her flesh. We took her onboard our boat, cut-off the net, and disinfected her cuts with iodine. Due to the knowledge of the scarcity of sea turtle rehab facilities and lack of expert care for injured sea turtles in Costa Rica, we released the female back into the water since she seemed otherwise healthy and strong. As biologists, we don't actively seek out injured wildlife, but our research happens to position us at the front-lines of reality looking at the detrimental effects of human impact on wildlife. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Our research is approved by the US IACUC and is conducted under research permits issued by the Costa Rican government, MINAE/SINAC and CONAGEBio. If you like what my research team and I are doing, please consider donating to our GoFundMe campaign to finance our next field season. https://www.gofundme.com/wuhvd6zj If you would like to find out more about our work in Costa Rica and the members of our field team, Brie Myre, Kim Lato, and Marcus Saikaley, check out our field blog http://plotkinlabtamu.wixsite.com/plotkinlab/blog At this point, I would like to thank again everyone that donated to my GoFundMe Campaign during the past year! Without you, this field season 2016 wouldn't have been possible and we wouldn't have been to the right time at the right place to help. Thank you! If you are interested in following my adventures in the world of marine turtles and ocean conservation, make sure to also follow me on Social Media: IG http://bit.ly/2Ky4DR5 - @ocean_amazon Twitter http://bit.ly/2lJpu64 - @ChrisFiggener Facebook http://bit.ly/2MBeFyp - @cfiggener http://puranatura.zenfolio.com/ Contact Email: [email protected] http://www.bio.tamu.edu/index.php/directory/graduate-student-figgener/ Christine Figgener, Dipl.-Biol. (M.S.) ----------------------------------------------------- GHOST NETS "Ghost nets are fishing nets that have been left or lost in the ocean by fishermen. These nets, often nearly invisible in the dim light, can be left tangled on a rocky reef or drifting in the open sea. They can entangle fish, dolphins, sea turtles, sharks, dugongs, crocodiles, seabirds, crabs, and other creatures, including the occasional human diver. Acting as designed, the nets restrict movement, causing starvation, laceration and infection, and suffocation in those that need to return to the surface to breathe. " https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghost_net If you would like to learn more about Ghost Nets. http://oliveridleyproject.org/what-are-ghost-nets/ https://www.mission-blue.org/2013/05/ghost-nets-among-the-greatest-killers-in-our-oceans/ http://www.ghostfishing.org/the-problem/
Views: 9387972 Sea Turtle Biologist
Sea Turtle with Straw up its Nostril - "NO" TO PLASTIC STRAWS
 
08:07
This is the original video! Filmed by Christine Figgener, marine biologist at Texas A&M University. ***WARNING: Graphic Content & Inappropiate/ Strong Language!*** This video shows graphically why plastic waste is detrimental to marine life, especially single-use plastics (such as straws, which are one of the most redundant items). This turtle suffers from an item that is human-made and used by most of us frequently. The research team around Christine Figgener (Texas A&M University) found a male Olive Ridley sea turtle during an in-water research trip in Costa Rica. He had a 10-12 cm PLASTIC STRAW lodged in his nostril and they removed it. SAY "NO" TO PLASTIC STRAWS, AND ANY KIND OF ONE-TIME USE PLASTIC ITEMS! If you would like to support our research and conservation efforts in Costa Rica, please think about donating to our GoFundMe Campaign http://gofundme.com/wuhvd6zj UPDATES The Plastic Pollution Coalition just launched their "No Straw" Campaign in collaboration with us. Take the No-Straw-Pledge and learn more: http://www.plasticpollutioncoalition.... ----- The Story behind the viral video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nLN52... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4MPHb... OUR STORY: My research team found a male Olive Ridley sea turtle during an in-water research trip in Costa Rica. He had a 10-12 cm PLASTIC STRAW lodged in his nostril. After initially thinking that we are looking at a parasitic worm, and trying to remove it to identify it, we cut a small piece off to investigate further and finally identified what we were REALLY looking at. After a short debate about what we should do we removed it with the plier of a swiss army knife which was the only tool available on our small boat (not intended for overnight stays), since we were on the ocean, in a developing country, a few hours away from the coast and several hours away from any vet (probably days from any vet specialised in reptiles, not to mention sea turtles) and x-ray machines. Plus, we would have incurred a penalty (up to time in jail) on ourselves by removing the turtle since that is beyond our research permits. He did very obviously not enjoy the procedure very much, but we hope that he is now able to breath more freely. The blood from the shoulder is from a 6mm skin biopsy we took previously to this event for a genetic study (part of our permitted research), which usually doesn't bleed much, but which started bleeding while restraining the turtle. We disinfected the air passageway with iodine and kept the turtle for observation before releasing him back into the wild. The bleeding stopped pretty much immediately after the removal of the straw, and when we released him, he swam happily away. The turtle very likely swallowed the straw while ingesting other food items and then either expelled the straw together with the redundant sea water through her nostrils, or regurgitated the straw and it ended up in the wrong passageway. The nasal cavity of sea turtles is connected directly to the palate (roof of the mouth) by a long nasopharyngeal duct. Copyright: Christine Figgener To use this video in a commercial player or in broadcasts, please email [email protected] If you are interested in following my adventures in the world of marine turtles and ocean conservation, make sure to also follow me on Social Media: IG http://bit.ly/2Ky4DR5 - @ocean_amazon Twitter http://bit.ly/2lJpu64 - @ChrisFiggener Facebook http://bit.ly/2MBeFyp - @cfiggener http://puranatura.zenfolio.com/ Contact Email: [email protected] http://www.bio.tamu.edu/index.php/directory/graduate-student-figgener/ Christine Figgener, Dipl.-Biol. (M.S.) ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- BACKGROUND What are single-use plastic items? http://www.greeneriepa.org/single-use... http://singleuseplastic.co.uk/what-we... What can you do? REDUCE (REFUSE=STRAWS)/ RE-USE/ RECYCLE http://www.recycling-guide.org.uk/rrr... Organise your own beach cleanups! An amazing plastic clean-up project is the TWO HANDS PROJECT, collect trash and post it on facebook! https://www.facebook.com/twohandsproject http://www.twohandsproject.org/ MORE INFO: http://micro2016.sciencesconf.org/ http://www.kcet.org/news/redefine/red... http://www.plasticchange.org/en/om-pl... http:/theoceancleanup.com
Views: 33190460 Sea Turtle Biologist
Nesting Sea Turtle Entangled in Fishing-Line
 
03:38
This video shows the detrimental effects of so-called ghost nets on marine animals. ***Warning: GRAPHIC CONTENT*** Video Credit and Copyright: Christine Figgener -------------------- Only a few weeks after a female was found by our research team entangled in fishing-line (https://www.youtube.com/edit?video_id=lVPSTkYihCY), we found another female during the synchronized mass-nesting in Ostional this August, also badly entangled in discarded fishing-line (also called ghost net) with her front flipper. The female was found while nesting and had dragged a bulk of fishing net up the beach with her, including a 1kg lead weight. Parts of the net were wrapped around her right front flipper and had started to cut into the flesh. Luckily circulation didn't seem to have been cut off and she was able to move her flipper normally, so we cut off the line and disinfected the cut with iodine. Given our knowledge of the scarcity of sea turtle rehab facilities and lack of expert care for injured sea turtles in Costa Rica, the decision we are usually facing is either leaving the animal as is or trying to help as much as we can by removing obstructing objects. As biologists, we don't actively seek out injured wildlife, but our research happens to position us at the front-lines of reality looking at the detrimental effects of human impact on wildlife. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ At this point, I would like to thank again everyone that donated to my GoFundMe Campaign (https://www.gofundme.com/wuhvd6zj)! Without you, this field season wouldn't have been possible and we wouldn't have been to the right time at the right place to help again. Thank you! If you would like to find out more about our work in Costa Rica and the members of our field team 2016, Kim Lato, Derek Dunlop, Erik Beck and Marcus Saikaley, check out our field blog http://plotkinlabtamu.wixsite.com/plotkinlab/blog If you are interested in following my adventures in the world of marine turtles and ocean conservation in general, make sure to also follow me on Social Media: IG http://bit.ly/2Ky4DR5 - @ocean_amazon Twitter http://bit.ly/2lJpu64 - @ChrisFiggener Facebook http://bit.ly/2MBeFyp - @cfiggener http://puranatura.zenfolio.com/ Contact Email: [email protected] http://www.bio.tamu.edu/index.php/directory/graduate-student-figgener/ Christine Figgener, Dipl.-Biol. (M.S.) ---------------------------------------------------- GHOST NETS "Ghost nets are fishing nets that have been left or lost in the ocean by fishermen. These nets, often nearly invisible in the dim light, can be left tangled on a rocky reef or drifting in the open sea. They can entangle fish, dolphins, sea turtles, sharks, dugongs, crocodiles, seabirds, crabs, and other creatures, including the occasional human diver. Acting as designed, the nets restrict movement, causing starvation, laceration and infection, and suffocation in those that need to return to the surface to breathe. " https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghost_net If you would like to learn more about Ghost Nets. http://oliveridleyproject.org/what-are-ghost-nets/ https://www.mission-blue.org/2013/05/ghost-nets-among-the-gre http://briemyre.blogspot.com/atest-killers-in-our-oceans/ http://www.ghostfishing.org/the-problem/ ------------------------------------------------------------ Our research is approved by the US IACUC and is conducted under research permits issued by the Costa Rican government, MINAE/SINAC and CONAGEBio.
Views: 428767 Sea Turtle Biologist
Eye to Eye with a Sea Turtle
 
00:35
Hey peeps! Many people have asked me about the turtle that is shown with me in my channel photo. Here is the video that I took while releasing her back into the water. We were conducting research (measuring turtles and taking blood samples) off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica and when I released this female she just hung around for a little bit longer. I am humbled each time I am allowed to be close to one of these ancient mariners, no matter how many times that might have already happened. The video was taken during research in Costa Rica, which is permitted by the MINAE/ SINAC in Costa Rican and approved by the IACUC in the USA. ---------------------------------- I sincerely hope you enjoy, and definitely let me know if you want more videos by giving this one a like and a share. If you are interested in following my adventures in the world of marine turtles and ocean conservation, make sure to also follow me on Social Media: IG http://bit.ly/2Ky4DR5 - @ocean_amazon Twitter http://bit.ly/2lJpu64 - @ChrisFiggener Facebook http://bit.ly/2MBeFyp - @cfiggener Contact Email: [email protected] Christine Figgener, Dipl.-Biol. (M.S.)
Views: 8832 Sea Turtle Biologist
Raising the hatching success of leatherback nests in Ostional Costa Rica
 
12:14
Presentation by biologist Christine Figgener on the International Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation in New Orleans, 2014. http://www.seaturtlesociety.org/
Views: 3176 Sea Turtle Biologist
Olive Ridley Sea Turtle Under Water
 
00:36
Olive ridley turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) UW in front of Playa Ostional, Costa Rica.
Views: 8385 Sea Turtle Biologist
Mating Olive Ridley Sea Turtles
 
00:20
Mating olive ridley turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) in front of Playa Ostional, Costa Rica.
Views: 12391 Sea Turtle Biologist
Pantropical Spotted Dolphins Underwater
 
04:35
A group of pantropical spotted dolphins (Stenella attenuata) off the coast of Costa Rica.
Views: 10429 Sea Turtle Biologist
Juvenile Green  Turtles Feeding Off Texas Coast
 
01:05
Juvenile green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) feeding in coastal waters close to Port Aransas, TX.
Views: 7065 Sea Turtle Biologist

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